RE/MAX 440
Peter Patkos
1110 North Broad Street
Lansdale  PA 19446
 Phone: 215-327-7491
Office Phone: 215-362-2260
Fax: 267-354-6879 
peterpatkos@remax440.com
Peter Patkos

My Blog

Most Consumers Don't Know Their Credit Score

October 28, 2013 3:27 am

A new survey found that most U.S. consumers don't know their own score, despite its importance not only in determining whether they can get credit cards, auto loans and mortgages, but also in employment and insurance decisions. The survey found that only 42 percent of consumers know their credit score.

The annual survey of 1,000 U.S. adults was conducted for by Ipsos Public Affairs. Fifty-six percent of respondents indicated they did not know their credit score, and two percent did not answer the question.

Credit scores represent a person's creditworthiness and can be obtained from the major credit bureaus—Experian, TransUnion and Equifax. Lenders use a consumer's credit score to decide whether to lend them money and at what rate. Credit scores are also used by organizations for screening employment, insurance and other applications. A consumer's credit report, which indicates whether a person pays their bills on time and how much of their available credit they use, influences their credit score.

Below are tips to help consumers improve their credit scores:

Credit Do's
• DO order a copy of your credit report annually. The three major credit bureaus are required to provide you with a free copy of your credit report at your request each year. To get a free copy of your credit report, visit www.annualcreditreport.com or call 1-877-322-8228. You can also obtain your credit score from any of these credit bureaus for a reasonable fee.
• DO know the power of credit. Banks look at your credit history as an indication of your future financial behavior. By using credit wisely, you can build a good credit history making it easier to get loans with low interest rates, rent an apartment, purchase a car or home, and may even help you get a job.
• DO read the fine print on the credit application. The application is a contract, so read it carefully before signing. Credit card companies are very competitive so interest rates, credit limits, grace periods, annual fees, terms and conditions may vary.
• DO pay at least the minimum due and contact your creditor if you have trouble making payments. This will help you to avoid late fees and a rising APR. To pay off your balance more quickly, pay more than the minimum due. If you are unable to make the minimum monthly payments, let your creditor know so they can work with you to create a more manageable payment plan.
• DO be wary of anyone who claims they can "fix" your credit report. No one can legally remove negative information from your credit history if it is accurate. The only thing that can fix a credit report is time and a positive payment history.

Credit Don'ts
• DON'T pay your bills late. Late payments can affect your credit rating and increase your balance. If you are unable to pay the minimum monthly payment, let your creditor know and they may be able to lower your payments.
• DON'T spend more than you can afford. Credit is a loan and has to be repaid. It is your responsibility to manage your debts and to keep your commitment with lenders. Avoid reaching your credit limit or "maxing out" your cards.
• DON'T ignore the warning signs of credit trouble. If you pay only the minimum balance, pay late, use cash-advances to fund daily living expenses or transfer a lot of balances you might be in the credit "danger zone." Talk to a non-profit financial counseling organization like the National Foundation for Credit Counseling (www.nfcc.org) to regain control of your finances.
• DON'T share your credit card number. Never give out credit card or personal information if you have not initiated the transaction. Be aware of identity theft and phishing scams that ask for credit card numbers. If you suspect that your identity has been compromised, call your bank and file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission at 1-877-ID-THEFT (1-877-438-4338) or www.ftc.gov/idtheft.

Source: American Bankers Association

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Tips to Protect Your Skin This Winter

October 28, 2013 3:27 am

(Family Features) From non-friendly weather conditions to itch-inducing dyes found in everyday products, your skin can be exposed to a variety of unexpected irritants. But, protecting and maintaining healthy, comfortable skin can be easy with simple tips and products.

“With so many skin types out there, getting to know how yours reacts to different factors – be it cold weather or harsh chemicals – is important,” says dermatologist Elizabeth Hale, M.D. “Take care of skin with products that are skin-friendly, mild and hypoallergenic, to avoid discomfort. Just be sure to test out each on a small area of skin before applying liberally.”

Here are three more tips from Dr. Hale to keep your skin feeling its best during the cold-weather months:

Stay hydrated: The key to protecting skin is to keep in check with everyday habits, such as getting good nutrition, enough sleep and plenty of water. Drinking at least eight glasses of water every day is necessary not only for your skin, but also for your body’s overall health. During the winter, try incorporating hot tea with lemon into your recommended daily serving of water to keep warm when you’re outside, but still give your body the hydration it needs.

Check your laundry
: During the frigid months, be sure to cover up with hats, scarves, gloves and long-sleeves to avoid cracked, dry skin. Also, go for comfort by layering soft, lightweight fabrics that aren’t aggravating to the skin, like cotton. Keep your favorite clothing clean and smelling fresh, without irritation to the skin, by using a hypoallergenic laundry detergent.

Apply sunscreen: From tailgating to hiking to skiing, make sure you’re still protecting your skin during outdoor cold-weather activities. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, one in five Americans will develop some form of skin cancer during their lifetime, so it’s important to apply sunscreen year-round, even when it seems as though UV rays aren’t as strong as they actually are. Aim to apply sunscreen liberally on all exposed skin before you step out the door and reapply an SPF 15 or higher lotion every two hours when outdoors for an extended period of time.

Irritated skin is no small matter and should be taken care of every day. Using the right products and taking necessary precautions to reduce the stinging, burning, itching and redness of sensitive skin will keep it feeling comfortable during all the colder weather months.

Source: Arm & Hammer

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Do's and Don'ts for Bringing the Next Generation into the Family Business

October 28, 2013 3:27 am

We often tell families that there is no "one size fits all" formula for transitioning a family business from one generation to the next. There are multiple variables in every family and business that impact how to best address the process in a given situation, making it challenging to offer tools like checklists to help with preparations. Yet, while each situation is unique, there are some experiences most businesses will face for which there is some common wisdom. One such situation is the experience of getting the next generation of family employees started professionally in the business.

Anyone who has ever begun a new job can attest that early accomplishments often play a significant role in one's long-term success. Of course, there are no guarantees for success, but a family member who starts his or her career in the business with strong objective success or as a clear contributor on a team will be more valuable to the company and likely have continued success than a family member who does not. With that in mind, here's that checklist I mentioned earlier; a list of "Do's and Don'ts" for onboarding new family employees in a family enterprise:

Do...

• Plan ahead. The most important preparations happen years before the new family employee actually joins the family business, ideally when they go to work at another company. The self-confidence, credibility and learning of outside best practices that come from working elsewhere have immeasurable value for the new family employee once they join their family's enterprise. Outside experience gives the new family hire instant credibility with other employees - credibility that can otherwise take years to develop, as some non-family team members may assume successes the family employee has at the business are thanks to their family connection. Even more important, however, is the self-confidence that is developed when a family member knows without a shadow of a doubt that he or she can succeed in the outside world, too.

• Start the new family employee at an appropriate level. If you start them at a level that's well above their skills and experience, then you risk overwhelming them and sending a signal to the rest of the organization that they will be given unfair advantages. If you start them at a level that's too low-because you started at the bottom and they should, too - even if they come with years of outside experience - then you risk putting them in a boring work situation or causing them a lot of frustration that could lead them to leave. Of course, many families believe it is important that their family employees experience all aspects of their business (tiresome jobs included), and that approach has great merit; the only caveat is you may not want to have a college-educated and well-experienced manager bagging groceries for more than a few weeks.

• Have the new family employee report to a long-standing employee and well-regarded non-family member. It's not always possible, but there are great advantages to having the new family employee report to someone who is not also a family member. Most importantly, this kind of reporting relationship will increase the chances that the new family employee will receive accurate performance feedback.

• At a minimum, provide the new family employee with the same performance feedback process as all other comparable employees. If all employees receive an annual formal performance review with informal "check ins" quarterly, then that's what the new family employee should receive as well. As it can be challenging for a mid-level manager to provide objective feedback to a member of the owning family, it can sometimes be helpful to develop some support from the HR department or other senior leaders in the business for this process. In addition, there may be a desire to take a more proactive role in the professional development opportunities for family employees if they have the ambition and potential to eventually move into more senior roles in the business.

• Communicate. Too often, the new family employee or the incumbent feels frustrated, angry, confused or even delighted about a particular situation... and they keep that feeling to themselves. It's important for all key parties to check in with each other frequently and informally, simply to keep the lines of communication open. Establish a tradition of a weekly breakfast or monthly lunch to ensure communication stays strong. Family members may have many qualities, but mind-reading isn't one of them!

Don't...

• Create a job for the new family employee. This is really an extension of the second bullet point above. Just as it's important to bring the new family employee into the organization at an appropriate level, it's equally important that a job is not created for them. If the position is not genuine, then others in the company will know that... and they will likely resent the new family employee as a result. In addition, it can be difficult to objectively assess the performance and development of the family employee if they are not in a role or job that has to be done, that provides some accountability.

• Put all the responsibility for the career entry and development of the new family hires on just one generation. Onboarding a new family employee in a family enterprise is a complicated and sometimes difficult process that is too big for any one person. It's not the new family employee's sole responsibility to make it happen; nor is it the sole responsibility of the incumbent. Successful onboarding is a responsibility that is shared by both generations.

If you keep the above items in mind while planning for the transition of your family's business, you will take an important step toward increasing the likelihood that your family business will continue long into the future.

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Selling Your Place? Tips for Negotiating

October 25, 2013 3:24 am

A blog at helpinghomesellers.com, has good advice for sellers who want to respond to low-ball offers. The site suggests instead of getting into a debate about money, try sweetening the pot with a variety of counter-offers, including:

• Paying for some of the buyers’ title insurance, closing costs and/or points.
• Pay homeowner’s association fees for a year.
• Look into buying down the buyers’ mortgage rate for the first year.
• Cover a year's cost for a lawn-maintenance/snow removal service.
• Pay or provide an allowance toward moving expenses.
• Provide the buyers with a home warranty.
• Pay for the lawn and pool services for a year.
• Offer a golf club membership, pool membership, or cable subscription.
• Offer an allowance to repaint, new carpeting or for window treatments.

Incentives, especially for first time homebuyers, can often do the trick, the site states.

Investopedia.com says even in declining markets it is extremely important to be cognizant of comparable properties, and to price one's home to entice potential buyers to view it and ultimately bid on it.

That site says sellers should reject the temptation to hold out for top dollar, or to price the home at the upper end of what the market will bear. To get a sense of what similar homes are selling for, Investopedia.com recommends:

• Attending open houses
• Perusing the newspaper for local listings
• Ask a real estate agent to print up comparable listings on the multiple listing service (MLS)

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Fixed Mortgage Rates Drop to Four-Month Low

October 25, 2013 3:24 am

Freddie Mac released the results of its Primary Mortgage Market Survey® (PMMS®), showing average fixed mortgage rates hitting their lowest levels since this summer amid market speculation that the Federal Reserve will not alter its bond buying purchases this year.

Findings

• 30-year fixed-rate mortgage (FRM) averaged 4.13 percent with an average 0.8 point for the week ending October 24, 2013, down from last week when it averaged 4.28 percent. A year ago at this time, the 30-year FRM averaged 3.41 percent.

• 15-year FRM this week averaged 3.24 percent with an average 0.6 point, down from last week when it averaged 3.33 percent. A year ago at this time, the 15-year FRM averaged 2.72 percent.

• 5-year Treasury-indexed hybrid adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) averaged 3.00 percent this week with an average 0.4 point, down from last week when it averaged 3.07 percent. A year ago, the 5-year ARM averaged 2.75 percent.

• 1-year Treasury-indexed ARM averaged 2.60 percent this week with an average 0.5 point, down from last week when it averaged 2.63 percent. At this time last year, the 1-year ARM averaged 2.59 percent.

"Mortgage rates slid this week as the partial government shutdown led to market speculation that the Federal Reserve will not alter its bond purchases this year. The weak employment report for September added to this expectation,” says Frank Nothaft, vice president and chief economist, Freddie Mac. “The economy added just 148,000 jobs, which was below the market consensus forecast and less than the 193,000 jobs increase in August."

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Are Dads The New Mom?

October 25, 2013 3:24 am

Who wears the pants in the family when it comes to household purchasing decisions – mom or dad?

According to a September 2013 survey by Child's Play Communications, titled Are Dads the New Black, mom remains by far the No. 1 decision maker when buying for home and family. Dads are making inroads, but not to the degree many now assume. And mom's evaluation of dad's contribution often differs dramatically from his own.

Conducted with The NPD group, an independent market research company, the Child's Play survey queried nearly 2,500 moms and dads – approximately 1,250 couples – across the U.S., asking for each one's view of dad's decision-making role in 20 different product categories. The survey looked at where dads were "entirely" responsible for a product category, then "primarily" responsible and lastly, where they "shared responsibility equally" with their spouses.

"Based on our immersion in the world of moms, it seemed that some of the claims about dad's involvement in household purchasing decisions were overstated," said Child's Play Communications president, Stephanie Azzarone. "Our goal in launching the survey was to separate perception from reality."

Some highlights:

• Moms remain the major household purchasing decision maker in about 80 percent of families.

• Moms are responsible for the majority of those decisions--about two thirds. This is notable because it contrasts with the long-held belief that moms are responsible for about 80 percent of household purchasing decisions—an indication that dads are getting more involved.

• Dads continue to dominate decision making in what might be considered traditionally "male" categories. 55.3 percent of moms and 62.2 percent of dads said that dad was entirely responsible for buying decisions related to Home Repair, and 50 percent of moms and 57.0 percent of dads said dad had sole responsibility for Lawn & Garden. Meanwhile, roughly a third or more said dads handle all decision making for Automobiles (38.4 percent of moms, 48.6 percent of dads) and Technology (31.8 percent of moms, 35.1 percent of dads). The percentages remained similar when families were asked what dads were "primarily" vs. "entirely" responsible for.

• Moms, however, dominated purchasing decisions for children's products. In fact, dad's role here was noticeably minimal. Moms said that only 1.1 percent of dads were entirely responsible for buying children's toys and clothes and dads were in close agreement, claiming sole responsibility for 2.2 percent of toy purchases and 1.2 percent of children's clothes.

• The balance improved when families were asked where they shared responsibility equally. The four categories that ranked significantly higher than others among both moms and dads were Home Furnishings (51.0 percent of moms and 46.0 percent of dads said decision making here was shared equally), Family Travel (51.0 percent and 46.6 percent), Family Entertainment (43.2 percent and 43.1 percent) and Appliances (41.4 percent and 36.2 percent).

Source: Child’s Play Communications

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Halloween Can Be Scary, Particularly for Pets

October 24, 2013 3:24 am

The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) warns people to keep pets safe this Halloween, a holiday that can be truly frightening—and a little hazardous—for pets.

"While Halloween is a lot of fun for kids, pets can be alarmed by the new activity and strange costumes. Many dogs feel they are the guardians of their homes, and they can feel threatened if a stranger comes into their area," explains Dr. Clark K. Fobian, president of the AVMA. "If your pet is apprehensive in these situations, you need to be sensitive to that and make preparations before Halloween to keep your dog or cat from becoming confused and fleeing your home or perhaps even biting somebody."

The AVMA has produced an informative video posted on the AVMA YouTube channel offering tips on celebrating Halloween safely with pets.
"Nothing will ruin your Halloween fun like an emergency trip to the hospital, or to the animal hospital, because one of your animals got into the candy bowl or got scared enough to scratch or bite," Dr. Fobian says. "Consider putting your pet into a place where it will feel safe. This could be inside a crate with a favorite toy or pet treat or inside a room with the door closed. If you're dog or cat is prone to becoming extremely stressed, work with your local veterinarian to find solutions. It might even be advisable to board an animal to remove them from the situation."

Here are some other tips to help keep your pet happy and healthy this Halloween:

• The cocoa in chocolate can be poisonous to dogs and cats. The darker the chocolate, the more deadly it can be. In addition, small dogs are more likely to be affected by ingesting a small amount of chocolate than larger dogs.

• Chocolate candies aren't the only sweets that are potentially dangerous. Some pets will consume a candy whole, including the candy wrapper, which can cause an intestinal blockage. Also, Xylitol, an artificial sweetener used in many chewing gums and baked goods, has been shown to be poisonous to dogs. In addition, raisins, a common healthy treat for kids on Halloween, can be poisonous to dogs and cats.

• If you fear your pet has ingested candy or any other potentially dangerous foods, contact your veterinarian or your local emergency pet hospital immediately. A quick response could save your pet's life.

• If you want to put a Halloween costume on your pet, make sure that the costume doesn't obstruct the animal's vision, breathing or movement. Also, it may be a good idea to introduce your pet to the costume a few days or weeks before Halloween, so it won't startle them on such a busy, unusual day. Never leave your pet alone while it is wearing a costume.

• Halloween decorations, like candles or jack-o'-lanterns, and pets don't go together. Your pet could knock something over and possibly start a fire or suffer burns. Make sure they're placed where pets can't access them.

• Make sure that every day—but particularly on Halloween—your pet has proper identification. With the front door opening and closing to allow neighborhood children to say "trick or treat," it's possible a pet could panic and run out into the night while you're busy handing out candy. Proper identification, particularly microchip identification with up-to-date registered information, will make it much more likely that you'll be reunited with your pet.

Source: American Veterinary Medical Association

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Boomers Much Less Likely to Shop on Cyber Monday

October 24, 2013 3:24 am

FatWallet.com announced results from its 2013 Cyber Monday Shopping Survey by TNS Global. Of the 1,000 surveyed online, 48 percent said they will shop this Cyber Monday, 60 percent under age 40 and less than 40 percent age 50 or over. More than half of those that plan to shop this Cyber Monday said they will spend more this year (52 percent, up from 33 percent from a year ago), and 44 percent said they would spend more than $200. When it comes to which way they will look to find savings, 78 percent said deals (products on sale), 55 percent store-wide discounts, 76 percent want free shipping and 30 percent will seek cash back. Ways they will shop for Cyber Monday deals:

• 91 percent will use online retailers
• 29 percent will use online coupon sites
• 23 percent will use Emails
• 18 percent will use online cash back sites
• 13 percent will use mobile devices
• 9 percent will use social media

"The majority of younger adults are more digitally connected then Boomers are, using emerging online marketing channels like mobile and social media to shop," states Ryan Washatka, FatWallet president. "Cyber Monday offers the perfect storm for these shoppers and the record spending we've seen the last couple of years supports this."

Items they will be shopping for the most on Cyber Monday:

• 54 percent for holiday gifts
• 34 percent for gadgets
• 34 percent for clothing
• 32 percent for books, movies or music
• 25 percent for toys
• 21 percent for tablets/Smartphones
• 19 percent for laptops
• 16 percent for TVs

When asked what time they will shop for Cyber Monday deals, 33 percent will start on Pre-Cyber Monday (Sunday), 69 percent on Cyber Monday (a.m.) and 19 percent during Cyber Week (Tuesday through Friday following Cyber Monday).

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Tips for Deciding When to Replace a Front Door

October 24, 2013 3:24 am

Homeowners looking to save on rising energy bills can start right at the front door. That's the advice of experts at Therma-Tru Corp. who suggest evaluating your main entry door at least once a year to determine the status of the door's operational capabilities and energy efficiency features.

"Every component of a home needs to be replaced at some point over time," says Derek Fielding, director of product management for Therma-Tru Corp. "Most homeowners can get years of service out of their front door, but there will come a time when a door needs to be replaced. That's why it's important to annually evaluate and maintain your main entryway."

According to Fielding, there are several easy ways homeowners can determine when it's time to consider a front door replacement.

Tip #1 - Open and close your doors on both dry and wet, humid days. Make sure all the components operate smoothly. If your door doesn't close securely, or fits tightly on humid days, then it’s most likely leaking air on dry days, causing the home to lose energy.

Tip #2 - Inspect the weather stripping around all sides of the front door to make sure it has not worn out. On a bright day, stand inside near your door and look for daylight flowing through the door perimeter. If light is coming in, then so most likely, is external air and possibly moisture. That means it’s time to determine if your foam-filled weather stripping may have lost some of its compression, cracked or simply worn out.

Tip #3 - Examine your locks to make sure they operate smoothly and are strong enough to help protect your home. Multi-point locking systems offer exceptional peace-of-mind and security for the home.

Tip #4 - Reach out and touch your door on both hot and cold days. If you feel the exterior temperatures on the inside surface, then your door may not have adequate insulation. In this situation, consider upgrading the door with a replacement that is more energy efficient and has an ENERGY STAR® qualified rating for your geographic area. Order a multi-point locking system on your next door for a tighter fit against the weather stripping, which can help provide even greater energy savings.

Tip #5 - Look at the appearance of your door. If you have a wood door, it may be warping or rotting after years of service. A steel door can get dinged and rust over time. And, it's possible that the style of the door simply doesn't match up with the design of your home. These are all red flags that it's time to replace your front door.

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Taxpayers Should Act Now to Take Advantage of IRS Changes

October 23, 2013 3:24 am

Unlike last year, tax planning for 2013 is not hampered by uncertainties over a looming fiscal cliff. Unfortunately, there is always some uncertainty and a few expiring provisions to warrant special attention by taxpayers.

Managing income taxes at year end involves techniques designed to address three issues:

• Accelerating or deferring income: If a taxpayer expects to be in the same or a lower tax bracket next year, it's best to defer as much income as possible until after the year-end.
• Accelerating or deferring deductions: If a taxpayer's overall tax rate is the same in both years, accelerating deductions achieves tax savings this year rather than waiting for those tax savings to materialize next year.
• Take advantage of tax provisions scheduled to expire at the end of 2013: There are several temporary tax provisions that can only be used this year.

Tax planning begins by projecting income and deductions for the year to determine your tax bracket and income thresholds that trigger higher and/or additional taxes, or limits the effectiveness of deductions. One of the impacts of the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 (ATRA12) is the reintroduction of the Pease limitation, which can greatly limit itemized deductions. Once a taxpayer knows what his or her income taxes will look like, it’s time to evaluate which techniques will help the most.

Strategies to accelerate or defer income:
• Adjust your elective deferral plans at work: Taxpayers who participate in 401(k), 403(b), most 457 plans, or in the Thrift Savings Plan can defer up to $17,500 this year. Taxpayers age 50 and older can defer up to $23,000.
• Harvest capital gains or losses: Long-term capital gains are taxed at 0 percent for taxpayers in the 15 percent bracket. Capital losses can be used to offset capital gains and reduce other income up to $3,000.
• Use the IRA: Taxpayers age 59 ½ and older can accelerate IRA distributions in 2013. Contributions may be deductible depending on your income level and whether you’re covered by a retirement plan through work. Taxpayers under age 59½ can convert traditional IRAs to Roth IRAs to accelerate income.
• Health-care assistance: People with health savings accounts – available with some high-deductible health insurance policies -- can save up to $3,250 tax-deferred for an individual and $6,450 for a family. Those who are 55 and older can save an additional $1,000. Flex spending contribution limits are capped at $2,500 this year.

Strategies to accelerate or defer deductions:

• Medical expenses: The Affordable Care Act (ACA) raises the income threshold this year to 10 percent of adjusted gross income for taxpayers under age 65. The threshold remains at 7.5 percent for those 65 and older. Taxpayers may need to prepare or defer medical bills to lump expenses in a single year to get the deduction.
• Gifts to charities: Use a donor advised fund (DAF) to maximize the tax savings from charitable giving. A DAF makes gifting appreciated securities easier. The DAF can be funded in tax years when the deduction will have the most impact. Distribution to charities can be made at any time without tax consideration.
• Qualified Charitable Distribution: This year only, taxpayers age 70½ or older can choose to direct up to $100,000 of their IRA-required minimum distribution to charity. By doing so, the distribution does not show up as taxable income, which can lower taxation of Social Security benefits and help reduce other threshold levels to further minimize taxes.

ATRA12 extended—but did not make permanent—several tax incentives for individuals. Taxpayers should consider whether they can benefit from these incentives this year and plan accordingly. The following provisions are set to expire on Dec. 31 unless extended again:

• State and local sales taxes deduction. Taxpayer can choose between deducting state and local income taxes or the sales taxes they’ve paid through the year.
• Deduction for teacher expenses. Eligible educators can deduct up to $250 of any unreimbursed expenses.
• Deduction of mortgage insurance premiums. Payments of Private Mortgage Insurance premiums can be treated as deductible home mortgage interest in 2013.
• Discharge of principal residence indebtedness. This can be excluded from gross income this year.
• Qualified Charitable Distribution. Taxpayers can make tax-free charitable donations from their required IRA distributions.

2013 is certainly an exciting year for tax planning. Start now in order to minimize your tax bill in April.

Source: Rodgers & Associates

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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